Posts Tagged ‘Carlos Mejía Orellana’

Reflection on the murder of Carlos Mejia, Radio Progreso


Radio Progreso Manager Murdered

Was Carlos Mejía a Target?

*This reflection was written by Lucy Edwards (PROAH, Hope in Action, Congregational United Church of Christ, Ashland, Oregon)


On the evening of Friday, April 11, Carlos Mejía Orellana, 35, was stabbed to death in his home in El Progreso, Honduras. The white Rosary his mother had given him that day was broken and on the floor of the living room of his home. Nothing of value was taken from house. His well maintained Toyota sedan sat on the carport, its alarm sounding. Why was Carlos murdered? Was he targeted for his work at Radio Progreso?



Carlos was the eldest of 11 children to parents Salvadora and Nicolas. The family moved from a rural area near Ocotepeque to the growing northern city of El Progreso when Carlos was 8 or 9. He was entrepreneurial man, an intelligent and diligent worker who began at the Jesuit radio station Radio Progreso in his early twenties, and eventually became promotion and marketing manager. He was quiet and thoughtful, and knew how to get things done. He seemed to anticipate your needs before you knew you had them.



His house was well constructed and secure. He paid attention to issues of security. The home had a high wall surrounding it, with strong gates and tightly coiled barbed wire. He had a boyfriend, but lived alone, with two socialized and friendly dogs; they were not part of the security plan. He adored them and spoiled them. They were companions.


carlos photo 2


His work at the radio station took him into the community. While shy in social settings, Carlos was not shy about the radio station. He loved his work selling ads and producing events promoting the station. He also had other jobs outside the radio station, all approved by his supervisor, Catholic priest Ismael Moreno, known as Padre Melo. Carlos had taught management classes, and recently was helping a community radio station get off the ground. He had just purchased a washing machine for his parents. It was still wrapped in plastic on in the carport the day I visited.



Carlos Mejia was one of 16 members of the Radio Progreso team granted protected measures by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Station employees had received threats of violence, and many journalist colleagues in Honduras have been murdered. Radio Progreso studios were occupied by the armed forces during the 2009 coup, and the station was surrounded by police on another occasion.



In a country with so many layers of corruption, militarization, violence and impunity, Radio Progreso, and its affiliated Jesuit research team ERIC (equípo de reflección, investigación y comunicación) are an irrepressible daily affirmation of freedom of expression, creativity and courage in Honduras. Their work confronts and directly challenges the corruption and impunity.



Was Carlos targeted because of his work at the Jesuit radio? At this point one can only speculate. He was murdered at his home, stabbed several times with a knife. It appears his body was posed. It appears the killer or killers removed his clothes and tried to create the illusion of another kind of murder. But the shirt he was wearing that night was never found. Someone took it. Someone took the knife. Someone left by the front door and the front gate, leaving them both open.



It appears Carlos’ attacker came to the house with him, perhaps in Carlos’ car. They ate chicken, and shortly after Carlos was attacked–perhaps initially in the living room where the Rosary was broken, and then murdered in the bedroom where his clothes were then removed.



As the marketing manager, Carlos’ work provided the financial capital for the radio. His death has been a huge blow to his coworkers and a direct hit against the radio station economically. As a gay man, his killer or killers may have considered his sexual orientation a vulnerability to exploit. Someone gained Carlos’ trust enough to be invited to his home, and murdered him.



In an immediate newspaper online account, police declared their suspicions of a crime of passion before they had conducted any investigation. No one has ever investigated the many threats against the radio station staff and management that began in earnest in 2010 and remain as permanent threats.



On April 18, U.S. Representatives James P. McGovern (MA), Sam Farr (CA), and Janice D. Schakowsky (IL) released the following statement on the murder in Honduras of Carlos Mejía Orellana.



“We are shocked and saddened by the news of the murder of Carlos Mejia Orellana, journalist and marketing director of Radio Progreso in Honduras. We extend our deepest condolences to his family members, friends and colleagues. Our thoughts and prayers are with them in this difficult time.



“We are very familiar with the important work of Radio Progreso, a community-based radio station that is a work of the Jesuits of the Central American Province. We note that the Director of Radio Progreso, Father Ismael “Melo” Moreno, testified before the U.S. Congress at the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission and described the constant death threats and attacks perpetrated with impunity against journalists in Honduras, including against Radio Progreso, its employees and its research arm, ERIC. Given the level of threats and violence, including assassination, targeted against journalists, the media and freedom of expression in Honduras, we are dismayed that the Government of Honduras has failed to implement protective measures for the employees of Radio Progreso, as called for by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights when, on four separate occasions over the past five years, it issued precautionary measures on behalf of 16 staff members, including Carlos Mejia Orellana, of Radio Progreso and ERIC. We are further troubled by news reports that the police had announced the murder was carried out by someone close to Sr. Mejia Orellana before any investigation had yet begun. We call upon the Honduran authorities to immediately implement protective measures for Radio Progreso and ERIC employees and to carry out a thorough investigation of the murder of Carlos Mejia Orellana to determine both material and intellectual authors of this heinous act and to bring them to justice in a timely manner.”

The Honorable John Baird April 29, 2014 Minister of Foreign Affairs Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada

2249 Carling Ave, Suite 418 Ottawa, ON K2B 7E9

Dear Minister Baird, We the undersigned are outraged and deeply saddened by the news of the murder of Carlos Mejía Orellana on April 11, 2014, a journalist and marketing director of Radio Progreso, a Jesuit community-based radio station in El Progreso, Honduras. We would like to express our deepest condolences to Carlos’ family members, friends and colleagues. Our thoughts and prayers are with all who are mourning this senseless death.
Following the coup d’état in 2009, Carlos and other Radio Progreso employees have been targets of repeated death threats because of their commitment to journalistic and social expression, and documentation of abuses of power and impunity. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) has repeatedly granted precautionary measures to 16 staff members of Radio Progreso, including Mejía Orellana, due to persistent threats against them. The Director of Radio Progreso, Father Ismael “Melo” Moreno, SJ testified before the U.S. Congress at the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission and described the constant death threats and attacks perpetrated with impunity against journalists in Honduras, including against Radio Progreso, its employees and its research arm, ERIC. Since last spring, Canadian parliamentarians have heard disturbing testimony about the deteriorating human rights situation in Honduras in the Parliamentary Subcommittee on International Human Rights. Given the level of threats and violence, including assassination, targeted against journalists, the media and freedom of expression in Honduras, we are dismayed and disturbed that the Government of Honduras has failed to implement protective measures for the employees of Radio Progreso, as called for by the IACHR. Honduras is one of the Western Hemisphere’s most dangerous places for the media. Death threats are often carried out and impunity prevails. Honduras continues to have the highest murder rate in the world (90.4/100,000) according the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). We ask the Canadian government to call on the Honduran authorities to immediately implement protective measures ordered by the IACHR and to carry out a thorough investigation into the murder of Carlos Mejía Orellana, to find those responsible for this heinous act and bring them to justice in a timely manner. Further, in consideration of continuing human rights abuses in Honduras, we ask that the Canadian Parliament, oppose and/or withdraw all support to Bill C-20, the Canada-Honduras Economic Growth and Prosperity Act, and do all that is necessary to ensure that it does not become the law of the land.
Testimony provided by esteemed human rights defender Bertha Oliva, General Coordinator of the Committee of Relatives of the Disappeared and Detained in Honduras (COFADEH), in the Standing Committee on International
Trade on April 8, 2014 emphasizes that the trade deal risks exacerbating human rights violations such as this, in Honduras.
Thank you for your time and attention.
Sincerely,
Alternatives
Americas Policy Group (APG), Canadian Council for International Cooperation (CCIC)
Association québécoise des organismes de coopération internationale (AQOCI)
Atlantic Regional Solidarity Network
British Colombia Teachers Federation
Canadian Jesuits International (CJI)
Centre justice et foi
Comité pour les droits humains en Amérique latine (CDHAL)
Common Frontiers
Horizons of Friendship
Jesuit Forum for Social Faith and Justice
Latin American and Caribbean Solidarity Network (LACSN)
Mining Injustice Solidarity Network (MISN)
Maquila Solidarity Network
Mary Ward Centre
Mer et Monde
Rights Action
SalvAide
Mr. Tyler Shipley, Sessional Lecturer, Humber College
cc: Wendy Drukier, Ambassador, Canadian Embassy in Honduras

Honduras: persiste la impunidad en ataques a periodistas y defensores de DD.HH.

Escrito por Redacción en Lun, 04/28/2014

http://conexihon.info/site/noticia/libertad-de-expresi%C3%B3n/honduras-persiste-la-impunidad-en-ataques-periodistas-y-defensores-de

Tegucigalpa, Honduras (Conexihon).-  Dos expertos en derechos humanos de Naciones Unidas pidieron hoy al Gobierno de Honduras que ponga fin a la impunidad en los casos de violencia contra periodistas y defensores de derechos humanos a través de investigaciones rápidas y exhaustivas.
“La impunidad sigue reinando en Honduras en los casos de amenazas, hostigamiento y violencia contra periodistas y defensores de derechos humanos”, advirtió el Relator Especial de la ONU sobre la libertad de opinión y de expresión, Frank La Rue, y la que se ocupa de la situación de los defensores de derechos humanos, Margaret Sekaggya.
Los expertos señalaron que la impunidad perpetúa estos crímenes y que en la gran mayoría de los casos, los responsables de estos actos no llegan a ser identificados. Los Relatores Especiales destacaron que la lucha contra la impunidad a través de procesos judiciales también contribuye a la reparación adecuada de las víctimas y sus familiares. 
“Ni las medidas cautelares ordenadas por la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, ni las reiteradas recomendaciones formuladas por los expertos de la ONU, han sido suficientes hasta ahora para que Honduras adopte medidas firmes para la protección de los periodistas y los defensores de derechos humanos”, según los expertos.
Los relatores sumaron sus voces a las condenas por el asesinato de Carlos Mejía Orellana, miembro del equipo de Radio Progreso en Honduras, y expresaron su solidaridad con sus familiares y colaboradores.
Asimismo, La Rue y Sekaggya reiteraron la recomendación hecha a Honduras sobre el establecimiento de un mecanismo de protección para periodistas, comunicadores sociales y defensores de derechos humanos./Fuente: ONU

Human rights lawyer assassinated in Honduras

A worker at a Jesuit-run radio and social action centre in Honduras has been stabbed and killed in what is believed to have been a politically-motivated attack.  CAFOD partner Carlos Mejia Orellana (pictured), a 35-year-old lawyer who worked for ERIC-RP was stabbed four times in the chest at his home in El Progreso. The Catholic aid agency vowed yesterday that the struggle for justice that he helped to lead will go on.

Carlos and other colleagues at ERIC-RP had received repeated death threats in response to the organisation’s advocacy and communications work, through which they challenge injustice and corruption in the government, police and judicial system. The threats against Carlos were so serious that, for the last five years, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights has called on the Honduran government to provide him with special protection measures. Sadly, no such protection was provided.

CAFOD currently supports the work of ERIC-RP in the Atlantic coastal region of Honduras where programmes cover human rights, water, livelihoods and disaster risk reduction. The social action centre is one of the organisations that protested against the recent appointment of Roberto Herrera Caceres as the new Human Rights Ombudsman, asserting his links to the 2009 presidential coup and mining interest groups and his insufficient experience in human rights law.

At a press conference, ERIC-RP’s director, Fr Ismael Moreno SJ, rejected rumours implying that Carlos’ death was linked to relationship difficulties and insisted that the police carry out a thorough investigation.

CAFOD’s Head of Region for Latin America and the Caribbean, Clare Dixon, said: “ERIC-RP has been one of our partners for more than 20 years, and the loss of Carlos at such a young age is deeply felt by us all. As with so many brave men and women in Latin America who have been cruelly robbed of lives spent fighting for justice, his struggle will go on, with the support of the Catholic community in England and Wales.”

According to UN statistics, Honduras has the world’s highest murder rate. Last year, an average of 20 people were murdered every day in Honduras, a country of just eight million inhabitants. El Progreso is close to San Pedro Sula, where the homicide rate is 173 per 100,000 people, reportedly the highest in the world outside a war zone.

CAFOD partner assassinated in Honduras

We are sad to report that last Friday, CAFOD partner Carlos Mejia Orellana was assassinated at his home in El Progreso, Honduras, but – with your support – the struggle for justice that he helped to lead will go on.  

Carlos had been stabbed four times in the chest. His death is believed to be politically motivated.

He was a 35-year-old lawyer who worked at ERIC-RP, the Jesuit-run radio and social action centre. We are currently supporting its work in the Atlantic coastal region of Honduras in programmes covering human rights, water, livelihoods and disaster risk reduction.

Carlos and other colleagues at ERIC-RP had received repeated death threats in response to the organisation’s advocacy and communications work, through which they challenge injustice and corruption in the government, police and judicial system.

So serious were the threats against Carlos that, for the last five years, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights has called on the Honduran government to provide him with special protection measures. Sadly, no such protection was provided.

ERIC-RP is one of the human rights organisations that protested against the recent appointment of Roberto Herrera Caceres as the new Human Rights Ombudsman, asserting his links to the 2009 presidential coup and mining interest groups and his insufficient experience in human rights law.

At a press conference, ERIC-RP’s director, Fr Ismael Moreno SJ, rejected rumours implying that Carlos’ death was linked to relationship difficulties and insisted that the police carry out a thorough investigation.

Clare Dixon, CAFOD’s Head of Region for Latin America and the Caribbean, said: “ERIC-RP has been one of our partners for more than 20 years, and the loss of Carlos at such a young age is deeply felt by us all. As with so many brave men and women in Latin America who have been cruelly robbed of lives spent fighting for justice, his struggle will go on, with the support of the Catholic community in England and Wales.”

According to UN statistics, Honduras has the world’s highest murder rate. Last year, an average of 20 people were murdered every day in Honduras, a country of just eight million inhabitants. El Progreso is close to San Pedro Sula, where the homicide rate is 173 per 100,000 people, reportedly the highest in the world outside a war zone.

ALER condena asesinato de periodista de Radio Progreso

http://alcnoticias.net/interior.php?codigo=25743&lang=687

La Asociación Latinoamericana de Educación Radiofónica, ALER, condenó de manera enérgica el crimen cometido en contra del responsable de publicidad y mercadeo de Radio Progreso (Honduras), Carlos Mejía Orellana, asesinado el viernes 11 de abril de 2014. Los asesinos sorprendieron al radialista en su casa, ubicada en la ciudad El Progreso (norte) en Honduras y le propinaron varias puñaladas en su torax que le quuitaron la vida.

Quito, miércoles, 16 de abril de 2014

Carlos Mejía Orellana

Radio Progreso es uno de los numerosos medios de comunicación que se opusieron al golpe de Estado del año 2009. Desde entonces, varios integrantes de la emisora recibieron amenazas de muerte. El director de la radio, el sacerdote jesuita Ismael Moreno. Dio a conocer que la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CIDH) había pedido al gobierno de Honduras que otorgara medidas cautelares a favor de Carlos Mejía Orellana en 2009, 2010 y 2011.

Según el sacerdote, las autoridades tienen responsabilidad por haber ignorado las solicitudes de medidas de protección frente a las amenazas que sufría Carlos Mejía Orellana y se conocía que su vida estaba en peligro.
“Este asesinato es un golpe directo, no solamente a la vida de nuestro compañero y de su familia, sino también al trabajo que realizamos como Radio Progreso y como Equipo de Reflexión Investigación y Comunicación (ERIC)”, enfatizó el P. Ismael Moreno.

Dulce García, presidenta de ALER, expresó su condena y repudio a este vil asesinato y manifestó la solidaridad con la familia de Carlos Mejía Orellana y con todo el personal de Radio Progreso. Así mismo exigió a las autoridades correspondientes que esclarezcan este homicidio, para que se sancione a los autores intelectuales y materiales.

“Las emisoras educativas, comunitarias y populares de América Latina, nos unimos a las voces de radio Progreso y de otras muchas personas e instituciones de Honduras que exigen justicia y canción para los culpables”, expresó la educadora y comunicadora venezolana Dulce García.

“Como ALER, deseamos que en estos momentos de dolor y desesperación, renazca también la esperanza, en la organización, en la unidad y en la lucha de nuestros pueblos por una mayor justicia y una democracia asentada en el respeto a la vida y a los derechos humanos de todas y de todos”.

La Presidenta de la Asociación Católica Latinoamericana de Comunicación, Signis ALC, Mónica Villanueva, expresó también su indignación por la situación de inseguridad y violencia en contra de los comunicadores hondureños, y en particular por este crimen que pone de luto a la comunicación popular y educativa de América Latina.

De igual manera, manifestó su solidaridad a los familiares de Carlos Mejía, a las compañeras y compañeros de Radio Progreso y a la Asociación Latinoamericana de Educación Radiofónica ALER e hizo votos para que las autoridades emprendan las investigaciones pertinentes para determinar a los responsables de este asesinato y se les aplique lo que la justicia determine.

Fuente: ALER

Carta denunciando asesinato de trabajador en Radio Progreso, en Honduras

Jueves 17 de abril, 2014

El Instituto de Investigaciones y Políticas Centroamericanas (CARPI por sus siglas en inglés) en la Universidad Estatal de California, Northridge, y los profesores afiliados, intelectuales, líderes comunitarios, y colaboradores cuyas firmas aparecen listadas abajo, condenamos el asesinato del Sr. Carlos Hilario Mejía Orellana, director de mercadeo y ventas de Radio Progreso, y miembro del Equipo de Reflexión, Investigación y Comunicación (ERIC) de la Compañía de Jesús en Honduras. El Sr. Mejía Orellana tenía 35 años cuando fue acuchillado en el tórax en la noche del viernes 11 de abril de 2014 en su casa de habitación en El Progreso, Yoro, Honduras.

La Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CIDH) en San José, Costa Rica había identificado al Sr. Mejía Orellana como un posible blanco debido a las amenazas que tanto él como el equipo de Radio Progreso habían recibido. Como resultado, la CIDH había demandado medidas cautelares de parte del Estado hondureño para la protección de la integridad y la vida del Sr. Mejía Orellana desde 2009. Si el honorable gobierno de Honduras hubiese tomado las acciones apropiadas para proteger la vida y la integridad del Sr. Mejía Orellana, él todavía estaría entre nosotros el día de hoy. Desafortunadamente, su vida fue truncada.

Por consiguiente, apoyamos las demandas de Radio Progreso por que se lleve a cabo una pronta, efectiva y eficiente investigación que clarifique el asesinato del Sr. Carlos Hilario Mejía Orellana. Encontrar a los autores intelectuales y materiales de este crimen no solamente fortalecerá al sistema judicial de Honduras, sino que además dignificará la vida y el legado del Sr. Mejía Orellana, y enviará un fuerte mensaje a los enemigos de la vida en Honduras.

Estamos preocupados por la vida y la seguridad de todos los trabajadores de Radio Progreso porque la mayoría de ellos han sido víctimas de amenazas y han sido nombrados como beneficiarios de medidas cautelares por parte de la CIDH. Desde el golpe de estado el 28 de junio de 2009, Honduras ha experimentado crecientes niveles de violencia. De acuerdo con las Naciones Unidas, en la actualidad, sus tasas de homicidios están entre las más altas en el mundo. Periodistas, activistas por los derechos humanos, grupos indígenas y descendientes africanos, maestros, abogados, artistas y miembros de las comunidades LGBTQ han sido blancos de persecución y asesinatos debido a su activismo civil. En el siglo 21, la libertad de información, los derechos humanos, y la participación cívica son imperativos para una democracia saludable en Honduras y en el resto del mundo.

En consecuencia, exhortamos al honorable gobierno de Honduras a actuar con prontitud, a aplicar la justicia y a proteger la vida de todos los trabajadores de Radio Progreso.

1. Freya Rojo, Director, Central American Research and Policy Institute (CARPI), California State University, Northridge

2. Douglas Carranza Mena, Director and Professor, Central American Studies Program, California State University, Northridge, and member, Board of Directors, Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Los Angeles

3. Beatriz Cortez, Professor, Central American Studies, California State University, Northridge, and member, Board of Directors, Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Los Angeles

4. David Pedersen, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, San Diego

5. Uriel Quesada, Director, Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Loyola University, New Orleans

6. Jeffrey Browitt, Professor, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia

7. Evelyn Galindo-Doucette, University of Wisconsin, Madison

8. José Aníbal Meza, S.J., Externado de San José, San Salvador

9. Timothy Wadkins, Canisius College, Buffalo, New York

10. Axel Montepeque, California State University, Northridge

11. Kency Cornejo, Duke University

12. Brinton Lykes, Associate Director, Center for Human Rights and International Justice, Boston College

13. David Hollenbach, S.J., Director, Center for Human Rights and International Justice, Boston College

14. Richard L. Wood, University of New Mexico

15. Celia Simonds, California State University, Northridge

16. Van Gosse, Department of History, Franklin & Marshall College

17. Nelson Portillo, State University of New York (SUNY), Brockport, New York

18. Yansi Y. Pérez, Carleton College, Minnesota

19. Martín Álvarez Alberto, Instituto Mora, Ciudad de México

20. Fundación de Estudios para la Aplicación del Derecho (FESPAD)

21. Equipo Regional de Monitoreo y Análisis de Derechos Humanos en Centroamérica

22. Kevin A. Ferreira, Boston College

23. Fernando Soto Tock, Colectivo No’j, Quetzaltenango, Guatemala

24. Adrienne Pine, Department of Anthropology, American University

25. Beth Baker-Cristales, Professor, Department of Anthropology, California State Univeristy, Los Angeles

26. Gloria Melara, California State University, Northridge

27. Leisy J. Abrego, Assistant Professor, Chicana and Chicano Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

28. Carlos Castellanos, México

29. Leonardo Lorca, Nuestra Voz, KRFK 90.7fm, Los Ángeles

30. Ruben Tapia, Enfoque Latino, KPFK 90.7fm, Los Ángeles

31. Felix Aguilar, MD, Physicians for Social Responsibility

32. Benedicte Bull, Centre for Development and the Environment (SUM), University of Oslo

33. Cecilia Gosso, Università degli Studi di Torino, Italia

34. Hannes Warnecke, Institut für Politikwissenschaft, Universität Leipzig, Germany

35. Ralph Sprenkels, Utrecht University

36. Jenny Pearce, Professor of Latin American Politics and Director, International Centre for Participation Studies (ICPS), Peace Studies, University of Bradford, UK

37. Mark Anner, Center for Global Workers’ Rights, Penn State University

38. Carlos Morfín Otero, S.J., México

39. Susan Fitzpatrick-Behrens, California State University, Northridge

40. Alexandra Ortiz Wallner, Instituto de Estudios Latinoamericanos, Universidad Libre de Berlín, Alemania

41. José Miguel Cruz, Florida International University

42. Rosemary Robleto Flores, colaboradora laica de la Compañía de Jesús, Chiriquí, Panamá

43. Miranda Cady Hallett, Otterbein University, Ohio

44. Juan José Ramírez Valladares, Universidad Internacional para el Desarrollo Sostenible, UNIDES, Managua, Nicaragua

45. Héctor Lindo, Fordham University

46. Heider Tun, University of Minnesota

47. Kalina Brabeck, Associate Professor & Chair, Department of Counseling, Educational Leadership & School Psychology, Rhode Island College

48. David Gandolfo, Furman University

49. Elizabeth Alvarez, Northwood Neighbourhood Services, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

50. Molly Todd, Montana State University

51. Robin Maria DeLugan, University of California, Merced

52. Ellen Moodie, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

53. Jorge E. Cuéllar, Yale University

54. William Stanley, University of New Mexico

55. Ricardo Roque Baldovinos, Universidad Centroamericana “José Simeón Cañas”, San Salvador

56. Elana Zilberg, University of California, San Diego

57. Dana Frank, Professor of History, University of California, Santa Cruz

58. Elizabeth Pérez Márquez, Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social (CIESAS) sede Occidente, Guadajalara, México

59. Carlos Vaquerano, Executive Director, Salvadoran American Leadership and Education Fund (SALEF), Los Angeles

60. José Artiga, Director Ejecutivo, SHARE Foundation

61. Manuela Camus Bergareche, Profesora investigadora en el Centro de Estudios de Género, Universidad de Guadalajara

62. Santiago Bastos, CIESAS Occidente, México

63. Thomas Ward, Department of Anthropology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles

64. Kimberly Gauderman, Associate Professor, History, University of New Mexico

65. Werner Mackenbach, Cátedra Wilhelm y Alexander von Humboldt en Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de Costa Rica

66. Ana Patricia Rodríguez, University of Maryland, College Park

67. Mary Addis, Associate Professor of Spanish, and Chair, Program in Comparative Literature, The College of Wooster

68. Valeria Grinberg Pla, Associate Professor of Latin American Literature and Cultural Studies, Department of Romance and Classical Studies, Bowling Green State University

69. Cynthia McClintock, George Washington University

70. Elisabeth Jean Wood, Yale University

71. Ricardo Moreno, Asociación Simón Bolívar, Los Ángeles

72. Erik Ching, Professor, History Department, Furman University

73. José Luis Benavides, Journalism Department, California State University, Northridge

74. Yajaira M. Padilla, The University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

75. Cecilia Menjívar, Arizona State University

76. Mónica Toussaint, Instituto Mora, México

77. Jeffrey L. Gould, Rudy Professor of History, Indiana University

78. Richard J. File-Muriel, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of New Mexico

79. Rose Spalding, DePaul University

80. Karina Zelaya, Writing Coordinator, Central American Studies Program, California State University, Northridge

81. Leonel Delgado Aburto, Profesor Asistente, Centro de Estudios Culturales Latinoamericanos, Universidad de Chile

82. John McDargh, Associate Professor, Department of Theology, Boston College

83. Jenny Donaire, California State University, Northridge

84. Nancy Pérez, Arizona State University

85. Jeannette Aguilar, Instituto Universitario de Opinión Pública, Universidad Centroamericana “José Simeón Cañas”, El Salvador

86. René Olate, The Ohio State University

87. Leigh Binford, College of Staten Island and Graduate Center, City University of New York

88. Ana Patricia Fumero Vargas, Profesora e investigadora, Cátedra de Historia de la Cultura, Escuela de Estudios Generales, Centro de Investigación en Identidad y Cultura Latinoamericana (CIICLA), Universidad de Costa Rica

89. Paul Mitchell, School of Theology and Ministry, Boston College

90. Odilia Dolores Marroquín Cornejo, Ministerio de Hacienda, El Salvador

91. Susan Whittaker Mullins, Mediator, Facilitator, Conflict Coach, Los Angeles

92. Fernando de Necochea, member, Board of Directors, Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Los Angeles

93. Linda J. Craft, North Park University, Chicago, Illinois

94. Miguel Ángel Herrera C., Universidad de Costa Rica

95. Martha Arévalo, Executive Director, Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Los Angeles

96. Angela Sanbrano, president, Board of Directors, Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Los Angeles

97. Periodistas de a pie, México

98. Kristina Pirker, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

99. Jody Williams, Nobel Prize Laureate, Chair, Nobel Women’s Initiative

100. Henrik Rønsbo, Director of Operations, Prevention of Urban Violence, Danish Institute Against Torture, DIGNITY, Denmark

101. Eileen Truax, periodista freelance, directora de medios en español de la Asociación Nacional de Periodistas Hispanos, Los Ángeles (NAHJ-LA)

102. Diego Sedano, documentalista, Malaespina Producciones

103. Alejandro Maciel, Editor, Hoy Los Ángeles, Los Ángeles, California

104. Carmen Elena Villacorta, Candidata a Doctora en Estudios Latinoamericanos, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

105. Eileen McDargh, CEO, The Resiliency Group, California

106. Gabriel Lerner, HispanicLA, Los Angeles

107. Cultural Survival

108. Ava Berinstein

109. Geoff Thale, Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA)

110. Hugo Lucero, Consultor de “Cultural Competency” en el Área de la Bahía, California

111. Raúl E. Godínez, Law Office of Raúl E. Godínez

112. Víctor Narro, UCLA Labor Center, and member, Board of Directors, Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Los Angeles

113. Jonathan B. Martínez, California State University, Northridge

114. Linton Joaquin, member, Board of Directors, Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Los Angeles

115. Jon Horne Carter, Department of Anthropology, Criminology, and Sociology, Le Moyne College, Syracuse, New York

116. Brandt Peterson, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Michigan State University

117. Omar Corletto, Confederación Centroamericana “COFECA,” and member, Board of Directors, Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Los Angeles

118. Agustín Durán, editor de noticias locales, Hoy, Los Ángeles

119. Marjorie Bray, Latin American Studies, California State University, Los Angeles

120. Donald Bray, Political Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles

121. Diane M. Nelson, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina

122. Linda Álvarez, Central American Studies Program, California State University, Northridge

123. Daniel Sharp, Legal Director, Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Los Angeles

124. Jorge Rivera, member, Board of Directors, Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Los Angeles

Tim Kaine – United States Senator from Virginia

Kaine Statement On The Murder Of Carlos Mejia Orellana In Honduras

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Tim Kaine released the following statement on the murder of Carlos Mejia Orellana in Honduras:

“I was shocked to learn of the murder of Carlos Mejia Orellana, journalist and marketing director of Jesuit founded Radio Progreso in Honduras.  My prayers go out to Carlos’s friends and family in the  El Progreso community that welcomed me as a young student in the 1980’s.

“Too often, Honduran officials have dismissed threats and attacks against journalists, and questioned whether the violence was connected to the victims’ profession.  In Carlos’s particular case, police have announced possible conclusions without even the start of an investigation.    Premature and speculative judgments cannot be allowed to stand in the way of a thorough investigation.  This must not be yet another homicide in Honduras that goes unpunished.

“Honduran police failed to protect Carlos, despite repeated requests to do so from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.  The police need to take immediate steps to protect Carlos’s surviving colleagues at Radio Progreso and its research arm, ERIC, who also live under constant threat.”

UNESCO condena el asesinato del directivo de radio hondureño Carlos Mejía Orellana

15-05-2014

La directora general de la UNESCO, Irina Bokova, condenó este martes el asesinato del directivo de radio hondureño Carlos Mejía Orellana.

Mejía Orellana era el responsable de marketing de la emisora de radio Progreso y fue encontrado muerto en su casa en la ciudad de Progreso, situada en el norte de Honduras, el pasado 11 de abril.

Trabajaba en la emisora desde hacía trece años y en los últimos meses había recibido constantes amenazas de muerte, al igual que el resto de los trabajadores de ese medio de comunicación.

El director de la emisora, el sacerdote jesuita Ismael Moreno, explicó que 15 trabajadores de ese medio están amenazados de muerte y que la radio había solicitado protección a las autoridades locales.

Irina Bokova indicó que “es esencial que ese crimen sea investigado” y afirmó que urge poner fin a “la violencia y la intimidación contra los periodistas en Honduras”.

También señaló que cualquier periodista en ese país que reciba amenazas de muerte tiene derecho a una protección efectiva por parte de las autoridades.

Carlos Mejía Orellana es el cuarto profesional de los medios que es asesinado en Honduras desde enero de 2013.

http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/spanish/2014/04/unesco-condena-el-asesinato-del-directivo-de-radio-hondureno-carlos-mejia-orellana/#.U01q8VcVA_4

Domingo, 13 Abril 2014 23:55

¡Auxilio doña Lisa Kubinske!

(Lisa Kubinske es la embajadora de los EE.UU. en Honduras quien señaló a Juan Orlando Hernandez como futuro presidente de Honduras)

Roberto Quesada

“Esta acción criminal contra nuestro compañero de equipo Carlos Mejía Orellana es un golpe a nuestro trabajo, a nuestra institución y por lo tanto denunciamos este hecho, porque vulnera el trabajo de comunicación, vulnera el derecho que tenemos a la libertad de expresión y vulnera la vida de todos y cada uno de los miembros de nuestro equipo.”—Ismael Moreno (cariñosamente “el Padre Melo”), sacerdote jesuita, director de Radio Progreso.

Los asesinatos en Honduras siguen desesperadamente, como para no dejar duda que ese primer lugar del país más violento, sangriento del mundo no se lo quita nadie. No faltará quien se sienta orgulloso de por primera vez tener a Honduras primera en algo.

Ya casi el pueblo hondureño se ha acostumbrado a que encuentran a unos cuantos encostalados, otros atados, mutilados, en fin los asesinatos en su más diversas formas, tonalidades como para ser exhibido en una vitrina como apetecible producto a la venta.

Y aquí se dice guerra entre maras, ajuste de cuentas, en algo andaba, no era mansa palomita, pero es una desgracia para el pobre muerto, que encima de estar muerto, se le culpa de su muerte. Y reina la impunidad a todo nivel. Aunque no crea hay mucha gente en Honduras que no sabe qué quiere decir la palabra impunidad, pues se lo decimos con sencillez: Es cuando se asesina, roba, se delinque de cualquier manera y no existe castigo alguno para los malhechores.

Pero entre estos crímenes, sobresalen unos, los que se hacen selectivamente. Esto se ha venido acentuado en Honduras desde poco antes del golpe de Estado del 28 de junio del 2009.

Poco antes del golpe comenzaron a asesinar a personas cercanas al entonces presidente constitucional Manuel Zelaya Rosales, y desde entonces a la fecha, eso no se ha detenido.

Carlos MejiaY uno de estos  asesinatos, que tiene todas las características de provenir del terrorismo de Estado, es el del joven responsable de mercadeo y ventas de Radio Progreso y miembro del Equipo de Reflexión, Investigación y Comunicación, ERIC de la Compañía de Jesús en Honduras, Carlos Hilario Mejía Orellana.

Este tipo de asesinatos, así como las intervenciones militares a gran escala, se dan generalmente en fechas en que la población esta distraída por festividades. Para navidad o año nuevo, Semana Santa en que la mayoría de la gente anda pensando en playas y otras diversiones, se ordenan este tipo de crímenes.

De esta manera se evita la repercusión de la prensa, sobre todo en los países que tienen una prensa no tan servil a los intereses de la minoría pudiente y de los extranjeros injerencistas, como es el caso de Honduras.

Y el hecho pasa como una noticia que pocos vieron y cuando se regresa de vacaciones ya hay nuevos asesinatos, nuevos problemas después de haber despilfarrado lo poco que se tenía en el festín semanasantero, y el asesinado pasa sin pena ni gloria al otro mundo.

Por supuesto que el asesinato de Carlos Mejía es calculado para darle un fuerte golpe bajo a Radio Progreso. Emisora insigne, emblemática con su postura digna contra el criminal golpe de Estado, de hecho, nosotros colaboramos tanto retransmitiendo sus noticieros como pasándoles informe de primera mano, tal como alimentamos a Radio Globo, Cholusat Sur, sin costo alguno, de pura fe en la solidaridad, durante lo álgido del golpe de Estado que aún persiste en Honduras.

Los funcionarios que frisan cifras, que los ponen como loros en estaca a mentirle a la población hondureña de que el crimen ha bajado (ha bajado de los cerros a la ciudad), ni ellos mismos se creen lo que los ponen a decir; por eso tartamudean, se equivocan, se enfadan ante ciertas preguntas, por eso el Gobernador no permite preguntas, da los “informes” y sale corriendo.

Entonces los hondureños/as, ¿a quién podemos pedirle auxilio? Pues a los verdaderos jefes, a los Estados Unidos. Los demás son monigotes puestos allí para devengar jugosos salarios, prebendas y meterles el cuento de que son importantes, cuando en la realidad para el ala radical estadounidense solo ellos importan, los demás son objetos desechables. Allá el Gobernador que se crea el cuento.

Es aquí en donde debería de pronunciarse Doña  Lisa Kubinske, embajadora de los EEUU, encargada de darnos la más moderna democracia a los hondureños/as, que se pinta para andar visitando “tigres” e inaugurando bases militares, pero se llama al silencio ante estos asesinatos fuertemente sospechosos de ser terrorismo de Estado. Nos predican la ejemplar democracia estadounidense, pero con palabras no con hechos, la jefa del gobierno de Honduras, Sra. Kubinske, debería jalarle las orejas al Gobernador y ordenarle, exigirle que cesen todo tipo de asesinatos, pero especialmente los selectivos, encaminados a silenciar al pueblo hondureño, cercenando la libertad de expresión, matando la libertad de prensa.

Asesinan a miembro del Equipo de Radio Progreso 
Alerta 017-14 
12 de abril de 2014

Carlos Mejia2Comité por la Libre Expresión (C-Libre).- Carlos Hilario Mejía Orellana responsable de mercadeo y ventas de Radio Progreso y miembro del Equipo de Reflexión, Investigación y Comunicación, ERIC de la Compañía de Jesús en Honduras, fue asesinado a puñaladas la noche del viernes 11 de abril en su casa de habitación en la colonia Suazo Córdova de la ciudad de El Progreso, departamento de Yoro, al norte del país.

En conferencia de prensa el sacerdote jesuita, Ismael Moreno, expresó que el hecho sangriento es un golpe directo, no solamente a la vida de Carlos Mejía y su familia, sino que también al trabajo que realiza Radio Progreso y el ERIC.

“Esta acción criminal contra nuestro compañero de equipo Carlos Mejía Orellana es un golpe a nuestro trabajo, a nuestra institución y por lo tanto denunciamos este hecho, porque vulnera el trabajo de comunicación, vulnera el derecho que tenemos a la libertad de expresión y vulnera la vida de todos y cada uno de los miembros de nuestro equipo. Para nosotros es altamente sospechoso que este hecho criminal haya ocurrido justamente en las vísperas de semana santa, cuando todo mundo se retira a sus respectivas vacaciones especialmente los entes responsables de la justicia, y cuando también es mucho más fácil que los hechos lamentables como estos pasen a un segundo y tercer término, por lo tanto nosotros presentamos como altamente sospechoso que ocurra precisamente en estos días”, explicó el padre Moreno.  

“Su asesinato es una muestra más del fracaso de las políticas de seguridad del Estado hondureño y de su falta de voluntad política para adoptar las medidas efectivas de protección establecidas por la CIDH. Frente a ello, exigimos una investigación seria y diligente que conlleve a la identificación, juzgamiento y sanción de todos los responsables de este crimen, sean actores materiales e intelectuales”, exigió Joaquín Mejía, también miembro del ERIC.

Con el fin de proteger la vida e integridad de Mejía Orellana la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CIDH) había otorgado medidas cautelares el 2 de julio de 2009, el 26 de abril de 2010, el 03 de mayo de 2010, el 02 de junio de 2010 y el 27 de mayo de 2011.